Recent Reports

To view all reports, first select an initiative to the right.

During the first month of this reporting period, the Palathuduwa Preschool celebrated the New Year. During the festival, organized by parents and teachers, the children were taught about the New Year’s customs, they played games, and they received presents from the teachers.

Classes and activities continued as planned, providing parents and guardians with support and advice in the proper care of their young children, and providing children with a safe environment, at least one nutritious meal a day, and quality preschool education, including health awareness, eco-awareness, diversity awareness, and basic communication technologies.

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New students joined the preschool for this new term. The older children welcomed the new children after learning how and why it is important to do so. During this term, the preschool syllabus included a school trip to two environments: a beach and a fishery harbor. These visits enabled the teachers to provide a hands-on learning experience about the coastal environments and the ocean. At the beach, children learned about the composition of the sand and seawater, as well as mirages. They learned also why boats stay afloat in the water. These experiences increased the children’s awareness and…

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During the first month of this reporting period, the Palathuduwa Preschool celebrated World Children’s Day. In the second month, the preschool conducted an exhibition of the children’s creations throughout the year, which was attended by many people, including local villagers and other preschools. In the third month of the reporting period, the preschool held a concert, organized by parents and teachers, where the children performed various dances on stage.

Classes and activities continued as planned, providing parents and guardians with support and advice in the proper care of their young children, and providing children with a safe…

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The clinic was open 10 days each month to provide free healthcare services to the community of Yayawatta and Seenimodera in Tangalle, Sri Lanka, and the surrounding villages and communities of Palapotha, Kadurupokuna, Seenimodera, and Morekati-Ara. During the fourth quarter of 2018, we saw an average of 21.5 patients per day, treating a total of 646 patients.

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The clinic was open 10 days each month to provide free healthcare services to the community of Yayawatta and Seenimodera in Tangalle, Sri Lanka, and the surrounding villages and communities of Palapotha, Kadurupokuna, Seenimodera, and Morekati-Ara. During the third quarter of 2018, we saw an average of 21.4 patients per day, treating a total of 642 patients.

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Project Objectives:

Support the community with free high quality healthcare services  Help to create a healthy community, especially amongst the younger generation

The clinic was opened 10 days per month to provide free healthcare services to the community of Yayawatta, Seenimodera in Tangalle, Sri Lanka, and its surrounding villages and communities of Palapotha, Kadurupokuna and Seenimodara.

For the Second Quarter of 2013, we saw an average of 20 patients per day with a total of 635 patients treated.

In the month of April, 214 patients were treated In the month of May, 210 patients were treated…
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Project Objectives:

Support the community with free high quality healthcare services  Help to create a healthy community, especially amongst the younger generation

The clinic was opened 10 days per month to provide free healthcare services to the community of Yayawatta, Seenimodera in Tangalle, Sri Lanka, and its surrounding villages and communities of Palapotha, Kadurupokuna & Seenimodera.

For the First Quarter of 2013, we saw an average of 20 patients per day with a total of 621 patients treated.

In the month of January, 208 patients were treated, with 70% presenting with respiratory tract infections, and fever.…
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Project Objectives:

Support the community with free high quality healthcare services  Help to create a healthy community, especially amongst the younger generation

The clinic was opened for 10 days each month and for the Fourth Quarter of 2012, we saw an average of 20 patients per day with a total of 627 patients treated.  

In the month of October, 212 patients treated, with 30% treated for heart diseased/conditions, 20% for viral fever and 20% for viral gastroenteritis. In the month of November, 211 patients treated, with 50% treated for viral fever, 20% for hypertension and 10%…
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Background

Sri Lanka marks the birthplace of Real Medicine Foundation, the place where the first promise was made and the concept of “Friends Helping Friends Helping Friends” was born. Almost seven years after the tsunami of December 2004, rural villages in Southern Sri Lanka still face challenges of coping with psychological trauma, poverty, and infectious disease outbreaks.

After completing Real Medicine’s immediate tsunami relief efforts at the Mawella Camp Clinic, a second clinic was opened in Yayawatta in October 2006. Now in its fifth year, this clinic remains fully active and continues to…

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Background

Sri Lanka marks the birthplace of Real Medicine Foundation, the place where the first promise was made and the concept of “Friends Helping Friends Helping Friends” was born. Almost seven years after the tsunami of December 2004, rural villages in Southern Sri Lanka still face challenges of coping with psychological trauma, poverty, and infectious disease outbreaks.

Photo: Families waiting patiently to be seen by Dr. Chamal

After completing Real Medicine’s immediate tsunami relief efforts at the Mawella Camp Clinic, a second clinic was opened in Yayawatta in October 2006. Now in…

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Background

Sri Lanka marks the birthplace of Real Medicine Foundation, the place where the first promise was made and the concept of “Friends Helping Friends Helping Friends” was born. Almost seven years after the tsunami of December 2004, rural villages in Southern Sri Lanka still face challenges of coping with psychological trauma, poverty, and infectious disease outbreaks.

Photo: Dr. Chamal Sanjeewa attends to patients at the clinic

After completing Real Medicine’s immediate tsunami relief efforts at the Mawella Camp Clinic, a second clinic was opened in Yayawatta in October 2006. Now in…

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Project Goal:

Sri Lanka marks the birthplace of Real Medicine Foundation, the place where the first promise was made and the concept of “Friends Helping Friends Helping Friends” was born. Almost seven years after the tsunami of December 2004, rural villages in Southern Sri Lanka still face challenges of coping with psychological trauma, poverty, and infectious disease outbreaks.

Photo: Community Volunteers gathering to help clean the clinic

After completing Real Medicine’s immediate tsunami relief efforts at the Mawella Camp Clinic, a second clinic was opened in Yayawatta in October 2006. Now in…

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Project Goal: 
Provide medical care to Tsunami affected families and the less privileged to help build a healthy community

Project Objectives:


Support the community with free high quality healthcare services 
 Help to create a healthy community, especially amongst the younger generation

Summary of RMF-sponsored activities carried out during the reporting period under project objective:

The clinic was open 10 days per month to provide free healthcare services to the community of Yayawatta at Seenimodara in Tangalle, Sri Lanka, and its surrounding villages and communities.
 A worm infestation treatment program was implemented…
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The Real Medicine Yayawatta Clinic is a community based project that is sponsored by The Real Medicine Foundation and managed by Mrs. Stephney Minerva Fernando, Project Coordinator for RMF in Sri Lanka with guidance and service support by Dr.Chamal Sanjeewa, special Medical Consultant to RMF.

The Real Medicine Clinic has been providing medical assistance since October 2006. With no resources to hire private transportation and no access to public transport, the clinic provides the only locally based medical care within the community, easily accessible and within walking distance of most villages and…

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The Real Medicine Yayawatta Clinic is a community based project that is sponsored by The Real Medicine Foundation and managed by Mrs. Stephney Minerva Fernando, Project Coordinator for RMF in Sri Lanka with guidance and service support by Dr.Chamal Sanjeewa, special Medical Consultant to RMF.

The Real Medicine Clinic has been providing medical assistance since Oct.2006. With no resources to hire private transportation and no access to public transport, the clinic provides the only locally based medical care within the community, easily accessible and within walking distance of most villages and beneficiaries.

The clinic operates…

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The Real Medicine Yayawatta Clinic is a community based project that is sponsored by The Real Medicine Foundation and managed by Mrs. Stephney Minerva Fernando, Project Coordinator for RMF in Sri Lanka with guidance and service support by Dr.Chamal Sanjeewa, special Medical Consultant to RMF.

This Project serves 2 sets of beneficiaries, direct and indirect. Members of the Yayawatta fishing community are direct benificiaries, utilizing clinic services, while residents of Kadurupokuna, Palapotha & Seenimodara are indirect beneficiaries. Humanitarian activities are provided equally to all beneficiaries. Elderly men and women in these areas have the opportunity to access the…

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Our clinic, community outreach and health education programs continue to provide vital support to the Yayawatta Village and surrounding areas. The Clinic’s beneficiaries include the population of Seenimodara, Kadurupokuna and Palapotha. Having this convenient access to free healthcare is especially important for young mothers, children, and the elderly. The diseases we see most frequently are upper and lower respiratory tract infections, viral fevers, gastrointestinal tract infections, heart disease, hypertensive disorders, skin diseases and different forms of arthritis.

During the months of March, April and May a total of 642 patients were evaluated and treated at our free clinic.
…

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During the month of February, 196 patients were examined and treated by our Medical Consultant Dr.Chamal Sanjeewa at RMF’s clinic in Yayawatta. All communities in the area now have access to these free health care services. The elderly men and women are benefiting significantly with the convenient access to medical service. Many have been able to better understand their chronic health issues and receive the proper care to help alleviate them, resulting in less frequent visits.

During the month, in addition to general examinations, our clinic provided the following services:

6 mothers obtained their family planning intramuscular injections…
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As we enter our fourth year at the Yayawatta Village in the Tangalle region of Sri Lanka, we look forward to growing with our community and to extending our outreach.

While most other Tsunami Relief Projects have stopped, our clinic remains fully active and continues to grow. Initially established to serve one community of 400, the Real Medicine Clinic has grown to serve five villages and provides health care to over 4,000 persons.

Presently, the clinic serves the communities of Yayawatta, Kadurupokuna, Seenimodara, Moraketi Ara and Palapotha.

Over three years ago, before…

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On November 7th, 2009 Real Medicine Foundation celebrated our third year providing free primary health care to the tsunami affected fishing communities of Tangalle.

The celebration provided us with the ideal opportunity to highlight our Maternal and Child Health outreach education programs. Joining RMF's Dr. Chamal Sanjeewa in the discussion was Tangalle's Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Chamila. Together they provided a very simple yet comprehensive discussion on Maternal and Child Health to the forty-two women who participated. All of the mothers from the villages of Yayawatta, Kadurupokuna, Palapotha, Seenimodara & Moreketi-Ara,…

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Our team at the Yayawatta Village Clinic was sponsored by Mr. Upamali Munaweera to conduct a special one day clinic at the Minhath Montessori Pre-School to benefit the families of the Dickwella community.

Real Medicine's efforts were profiled by two English speaking newspapers, one of which is listed below. We'd like to extend a special thanks to Mr. Upamali Munaweera for her generous support.

Please click here for the full story.

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On July 4th, 2009 Real Medicine Foundation held a ceremony to honor the efforts of the Yayawatta community to help clean the clinic premises to prevent the spread of Dengue Fever. In response to the outbreak of Dengue Fever earlier this year that took the lives of four children and two elderly community members, the local government required mandatory cleaning of all private and public premises.

The Yayawatta community joined together to ensure that the community center, the location of the Real Medicine Primary Care Clinic, was thoroughly cleaned according to the government directive. Below is the report…

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The Dengue Fever outbreak in late February, early March marked an active period for our clinic. In addition to treating many new cases over the past few months and engaging in public education about the ways to control the spread of disease, we also participated in a region wide clean up to minimize the breeding of mosquitoes. Measures were taken to advise parents to be vigilant around their homes and to report any illness so children could be referred to the base hospital for further tests.

With the exception of these challenges, the clinic operations remained stable over…

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To expand our reach to the surrounding communities, our primary health care clinic staff conducts off-site clinics at local schools and community centers to provide poor rural children with free checks-ups, and medicines.

Our most recent off-site function was on February 2nd at Tangalle Children's Relay. Our team below was on hand to serve the children of the school, their parents and members of the community.

While the children were the main focus, news traveled fast throughout the community and the clinic was crowded with adults and seniors wishing to take advantage of the free medical…

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Now entering it's third year, the Yayawatta Village Medical Clinic provided free health care services to 2483 community members from four villages over the course of 2008. Other highlights included:

The joint publishing of Dr. Sanjeewa Chamal's award winning book on Family Health Care, which was funded by International Service Partners An invitation to sponsor Global Children's Health Day hosted by First Lady Rajapaksa RMF initiated it community outreach programs by conducting one day free clinics at local elementary schools

This year, to support cultural integrity, we intend on offering Ayurvedic Medicines through our clinic…

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On October 28th, 2008, Real Medicine Foundation celebrated it's two year anniversary at the Yayawatta Tsunami Relocation Village in Seenimodora.. In collaboration with International Service Partners, we celebrated the success of the clinic and presented the community members with a book on Home Health Care written by our clinic physician Dr. Chamal Sanjeewa which won the most prestigious Presidential Award for 2007. International Service Partners provided funding for the production of 100 copies that were donated to each of the families.

In attendance were Ms. Lexia Campbell of International Service Partners who presented books to the residence…

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At the request of the Tangalle Police department, Real Medicine Foundation became a lead sponsor for the Tangalle, World Children's Day Celebration at Rajapaksa Field. Real Medicine provided funding for the certificates passed out to over 1000 children attending the event in recognition of their participation.

The first lady of Sri Lanka, Madame Shiranthie Rajapaksha, was in attendance and our Project Coordinator, Ms. Minerva Fernando and Accountant Nishantha Sankakelum were guests at the event as well.

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Now in its third full year of operation, Real Medicine's Clinic at Yayawatta Tsunami Village in Seenimodara remains the only free medical clinic in the Hambantota district providing services to the poorest communities. Recently, our staff extended it's reach to another sector of the community in support of families working hard to make ends meet who often don't have time or money to take preventive measures to assure the health of their children.

Aware of our success in Seenimodora, the faculty of the Annapitiya Janasuwaya Singithie Pre-School requested a one day clinic to provide…

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Fast approaching is the two-year anniversary for the Real Medicine Clinic in Yayawatta Tsunami Village in Seenimodora. Our staff continues to provide high impact care to its community members, care that now reaches out to three surrounding communities, including Polapotha, Kadurupakona and Moraketi Ara. On average, 200 patients per month visit the clinic where over 3000 impoverished people have weekly access to free medical services.

In addition to medical services our staff provides psychological support to those still suffering from post-traumatic stress and models a strong value system for personal accountability for health and establishing and respecting social…

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Inland from the coast, situated quite far from convenient medical care sits the Seenimodora Yayawatta Village, a community of 95 families relocated with the support of International Service Partners. In 2006, Real Medicine Foundation elected to provide a free medical clinic to this very poor village community who lacked the means of transport to seek medical attention when it arose. Today the clinic services an additional four surrounding villages and over 250 people per month.

This medical clinic remains one of the only post tsunami projects in the district and now serves four…

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Project Goal: Provide long-term medical support and treatment to children suffering from congenital health conditions affecting Growth Hormone production and cholesterol modulation.                         

Project Objectives: To coordinate and manage the system which delivers treatment to the children, provides medical consultations and ensures patient compliance to treatment protocols to optimize the children’s chances for growth and maximum health benefits.  

Madumekala:

Her weight has continued to be on the low side (20.5kg last quarter to 20.4 at end of this quarter) but she has continued to grow and is now 126…
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Background

In 2005, shortly after the tsunami, Dr. Martina Fuchs met Madumekala, an adolescent girl suffering from panhypopituitarism. At age 11, Madu was the height of a three year old. In an unsupported gesture of compassion, Dr. Fuchs chose to fund Madu's treatment for growth hormone therapy and initiated the supervision of this treatment through Ruhuna Medical College, Galle. While over the next two years, as RMF expanded this program to care for 6 more children suffering from long term health conditions, it was impossible to predict that this one act of compassion would initiate a country…

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Background

In 2005, shortly after the tsunami, Dr. Martina Fuchs met Madumekala, an adolescent girl suffering from panhypopituitarism. At age 11, Madu was the height of a three year old. In an unsupported gesture of compassion, Dr. Fuchs chose to fund Madu's treatment for growth hormone therapy and initiated the supervision of this treatment through Ruhuna Medical College, Galle. While over the next two years, as RMF expanded this program to care for 6 more children suffering from long term health conditions, it was impossible to predict that this one act of compassion would initiate a country…

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Project Goal:

In 2005, shortly after the tsunami, Dr. Martina Fuchs met Madumekala, an adolescent girl suffering from panhypopituitarism. At age 11, Madu was the height of a three year old. In an unsupported gesture of compassion, Dr. Fuchs chose to fund Madu's treatment for growth hormone therapy and initiated the supervision of this treatment through Ruhuna Medical College, Galle. While over the next two years, as RMF expanded this program to care for 6 more children suffering from long term health conditions, it was impossible to predict that this one act of compassion would initiate a…

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Our Children’s Long Term Medical Treatment and Growth Hormone Project continues into 2011 with 5 children being treated to promote normal levels of growth and weight for their age and any other serious medical issues that are brought to our attention. Each month the families are seen by Prof. Sujeewa Amarasena, Head of the Department of Pediatrics at the Karapitya Teaching Hospital in Galle, Sri Lanka.

Real Medicine continues to provide food parcels and contribute to each family’s travel expenses incurred in visiting the hospital for the children’s treatment.

Madumekala
 In 2005 shortly after the tsunami,…

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Photo above: (From left) Tharindu, Madumekala, Fazeer, Madura and Gayan

Our Children’s Long Term Medical Treatment and Growth Hormone Project continues into 2011 with 5 children being treated to promote normal levels of growth and weight for their age and any other serious medical issues that are brought to our attention. Each month the families are seen by Prof. Sujeewa Amarasena, Head of the Department of Pediatrics at the Karapitya Teaching Hospital in Galle, Sri Lanka.

Real Medicine continues to provide food parcels and contribute to each family’s travel expenses incurred in visiting the hospital for the children’s treatment.

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Our Children’s Long Term Medical Treatment and Growth Hormone Projects continues into 2011 with 5 children being treated to promote normal levels of growth and weight for their age and any other serious medical issues that are brought to our attention. Each month the families are seen by Prof. Sujeewa Amarasena, Head of the Department of Pediatrics at the Karapitya Teaching Hospital in Galle, Sri Lanka.

Photo above: Children from left to right; Gayan, Fazeer, Madura, and Madumekala

Real Medicine has also decided to provide food parcels and contribute to each family’s travel expenses…

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Our Children’s Long Term Medical Treatment and Growth Hormone Projects continue with 6 children being treated to promote normal levels of growth and weight for their age. Each month the families are seen by Prof. Sujeewa Amarasena, Head of the Department of Pediatrics at the Karapitya Teaching Hospital in Galle, Sri Lanka. Real Medicine has also decided to contribute to each family’s travel expenses to visit the hospital for the children’s treatment as this was becoming more and more unaffordable for the families. Our program is providing a template to follow for others who wish to sponsor groups of…

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Photo: Fazeer, second from left, and the other kids.

On 11th of March 2010 Real Medicine staff accompanied the children in the program, who live in the Matara and Hambantota districts, to Ruhuna Medical College.

Two of the children, Fazeer Ahamed and Madura Madusanka live in Dickwella & Kamburugamuwa and Gayan Madushanka lives in Angunukolapelessa.

In addition to their physicals, Fazir and Gayan received replacement auto injectors to administer their treatments from A. Baurs representative Mrs. Shanuki.

A. Baurs will be providing back up auto injectors for the program to be held…

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On 11th of March 2010 Real Medicine staff accompanied the children in the program, who live in the Matara and Hambantota districts, to Ruhuna Medical College.

Two of the children, Fazeer Ahamed and Madura Madusanka live in Dickwella & Kamburugamuwa and Gayan Madushanka lives in Angunukolapelessa.

In addition to their physicals, Fazir and Gayan received replacement auto injectors to administer their treatments from A. Baurs representative Mrs. Shanuki.

A. Baurs will be providing back up auto injectors for the program to be held at Ruhuna College in the event there is a malfunction…

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On 11th of March 2010 Real Medicine staff accompanied the children in the program, who live in the Matara and Hambantota districts, to Ruhuna Medical College.

Two of the children, Fazeer Ahamed and Madura Madusanka live in Dickwella & Kamburugamuwa and Gayan Madushanka lives in Angunukolapelessa.

In addition to their physicals, Fazir and Gayan received replacement auto injectors to administer their treatments from A. Baurs representative Mrs. Shanuki.

A. Baurs will be providing back up auto injectors for the program to be held at Ruhuna College in the event there is a malfunction…

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On Friday January 23rd, Nishantha Sandakelum and I, along with the children from Tangalle and their parents, made a trip to Ruhuna Medical College for the children’s comprehensive physicals. These assessments track the growth of the children enrolled in the long term Human Growth Hormone treatment program.

Madumekala is entering her third year of treatment and it has been suggested that we increase her dosage slightly to leverage her age and time remaining for treatment. She started the program at age 11 and had a bone age of 3 years old at that time. She recently turned 15…

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In addition to our sponsored children we provided transportation for an infant who was brought to our attention who exhibited stunted growth. The parents did not have the money to make the trip to the hospital nor for the evaluations necessary to determine what congenital disorder the child suffers from. Professor Sujeewa did a full evaluation and determined that the stunted growth was not due to growth hormone deficiency. He will be providing us with a full report upon completion of blood testing.

RMF staff hired a van for the trip and as Ms. Fernando wrote…

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In 2005 shortly after the tsunami, Dr. Martina Fuchs, met Madumekala, an adolescent girl suffering from panhypopituitarism. At age 11, Madu was the height of a three year old. In an unsupported gesture of compassion, Dr. Fuchs chose to fund Madu's treatment for growth hormone therapy through Ruhuna Medical College. While over the next two years as this program expanded to care for 5 children suffering from similar conditions, it was impossible to predict that this one act of compassion would initiate a country wide program to identify over 40 more children suffering from this type of congenital disorder…

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Our project reports could not have been prepared without the help of our Sri Lankan Project Team. Special thanks to Minerva Fernando, Nishantha Sandakelum, Dr. Chamal Sanjeewa, Ms. Dimuthi, Ms. Samanthi, Mr. Mahendra, Mr. Imthiyas and Professor Sujeewa.

Over three years after the tsunami, Sri Lanka still faces many challenges on the road to socio-economic recovery. From heightened military activity in the north and east and increased attacks by rebel forces on civilians, to rising food and petrol costs, the challenges continue to silently take their toll. Resilient as they may be when adversity strikes, the Sri…

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Photo: Children and parents gather for the painting competition

Objectives:

Work with guardians and caretakers to assist in proper caretaking of the children; Educate children in the area to ensure health awareness and proper sanitation; Provide the children with nutritious meals; Educate children about their environment, integrating eco-awareness and outdoor activities into   their routines; Educate them about natural disasters and environmental pollution, including small skills they can utilize to help preserve their surroundings; Diversity education about cultural and ethnic diversity in their community, including exercises aimed at increasing tolerance and understanding of differences; Give…
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Objectives:

Work with guardians and caretakers to assist in proper caretaking of the children; Educate children in the area to ensure health awareness and proper sanitation; Provide the children with nutritious meals; Educate children about their environment, integrating eco-awareness and outdoor activities into   their routines; Educate them about natural disasters and environmental pollution, including small skills they can utilize to help preserve their surroundings; Diversity education about cultural and ethnic diversity in their community, including exercises aimed at increasing tolerance and understanding of differences; Give lessons to children about modern communication technologies, including the use of mobile phones;…
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Objectives:

Work with guardians and caretakers to assist in proper caretaking of the children; Educate children in the area to ensure health awareness and proper sanitation; Provide the children with nutritious meals; Educate children about their environment, integrating eco-awareness and outdoor activities into   their routines; Educate them about natural disasters and environmental pollution, including small skills they can utilize to help preserve their surroundings; Diversity education about cultural and ethnic diversity in their community, including exercises aimed at increasing tolerance and understanding of differences; Give lessons to children about modern communication technologies, including the use of mobile phones;…
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Objectives:
• Work with guardians and caretakers to assist in proper caretaking of the children;
• Educate children in the area to ensure health awareness and proper sanitation;
• Provide the children with nutritious meals;
• Educate children about their environment, integrating eco-awareness and outdoor activities into   their routines;
• Educate them about natural disasters and environmental pollution, including small skills they can utilize to help preserve their surroundings;


• Diversity education about cultural and ethnic diversity in their community, including exercises aimed at increasing tolerance and understanding of differences;
• Give lessons to children about modern communication technologies, including the use…

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Palathuduwa Preschool – Children’s Fair and Market

On July 30th, 2010, the Palathuduwa Preschool conducted its first “Kids Fair” in many years. With contributions from the teachers, parents and villagers from the surrounding community, the fair featured a market where children could sell organic produce. Children from the school dressed as local salesmen from the market, ran stalls selling fruits and vegetables from their gardens, and practiced basic arithmetic (with a little help from their parents) by counting money and change. All of the produce was grown completely organically, integrating a valuable environmental lesson into the activity.
 

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Our Tangalle Children Relay Preschool has been operating successfully at its old location from 2006 until the end of 2009. During this time, teachers’ salaries were covered, the children were provided with uniforms, stationary, music instruments, toys, school materials, cultural and educational tours, a daily meal, and medical treatments – all free of charge.

Over the past few years the community we have been serving has been able to slowly recover from the December 2004 Tsunami and return to their previous lifestyle. This also means the community is now in a position to be able to afford to…

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The small town of Dickwella in the South of Sri Lanka is a predominately Sinhalese community. Only 5% of the community is comprised of Tamil-speaking Muslims. Of the 78 preschools in the area, only two cater specifically to the Tamil community. Classes at the Minhath Preschool are taught in the native language and children receive instruction in Arabic so they can read the Koran.

The preschool classes, which are based on the Montessori Education Model, include academics, art classes, performance events, and sports activities. We finished out the year with 21 children enrolled, ages 4-5…

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The small town of Dickwella in the South of Sri Lanka is a predominately Sinhalese community. Only 5% of the community is comprised of Tamil-speaking Muslims. Of the 78 preschools in the area, only two cater specifically to the Tamil community. Classes at the Minhath Preschool are taught in the native language and children receive instruction in Arabic so they can read the Koran.
The preschool classes, which are based on the Montessori Education Model, include academics, art classes, performance events, and sports activities. In 2011, there are 22 children enrolled, ages 4-5 years old, with 4 teachers and one…

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The small town of Dickwella in the South of Sri Lanka is a predominately Sinhalese community. Only 5% of the community is comprised of Tamil-speaking Muslims. Of the 63 preschools in the area, only one, The Minhath Montessori preschool, caters specifically to the 630 families of the Tamil community. Classes are taught in the native language and children receive instruction in Arabic so they can read the Koran.

The preschool classes, which are based on the Montessori Education Model, include academics, art classes, performance events and sports activities. Twenty children, 10 boys and 10 girls, ages 4-5…

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At the request of Mr. Imthiyas, Director of the One Heart Educational Center and the Minhath Montessori Pre-school, Real Medicine Foundation with the generous support of Mrs. Upamali Munaweera, conducted a one day medical clinic for the predominantly Muslim members of the Yonakapura Community, Dickwella.RMF staff provided on site medical evaluations for Minhath Pre-School children, their parents & the elderly and less privileged members of the community.
A target population of 122 was selected:

21 Children 42 Parents 04 Teachers 25 elderly Females 30 elderly Males

And 148 patients were evaluated and treated.

This special clinic was…

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For the year 2009, there are now 20 new children enrolled in the pre-school. We employ four teachers and one caretaker to support the school activities. We are pleased to have the opportunity to provide the Muslim, Tamil speaking children in this community the opportunity to attend this pre-school. The after school study programs for young adults, age 13-15, that are sponsored by the school and Mr. Imthiyas, its director, have also increased the confidence of the community that they would get sound education and be prepared for the future.

Students of the under 7-year of age group…

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On August 17th, 2008, the Minhath Montessori Pre-school hosted a regional sports event for the children of the school and the surrounding Muslim community. Our Project Coordinator, Minerva Fernando was invited as the featured guest to hand out the awards to the winners of the day’s events.

Minerva reports that the children enjoyed the sports festival and her visit provided her the opportunity to “witness the cooperation of the Muslim Community, not just parents but other members who came to watch the festival.”

Minerva explained that the families are appreciative of Real Medicine’s investment in their community…

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The Minhath Montessori Pre-school, located in Dickwella is the only Tamil/Muslim school of its kind in the Tangallle Region where pre-school children can study in their native language and receive instruction in Arabic so they can read the Koran. Recently the Tangalle Muslim School was closed and children in this community now have nowhere to study in their native language and must attend the public Singhalese schools.

In light of this, perhaps the most important aspect of this school is that it goes beyond a mere offering of education by providing a venue for…

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The MINHATH Pre-school is the first ever pre-school for the children of the Muslim minority community in Dickwella, Sri Lanka. The new building was officially opened on November 25, 2006. School activities started on January 8, 2007.

Four Teachers were hired:
1. Miss M.R.B.Rizka Latheef
 2. Miss M.F.Nazaha 
3. Miss M.H.N.S.Nasahiya
 4. Miss M.N.F.Rumaiz

26 children are attending the pre-school right now, ages 3 to 5 years.

The construction of the pre-school was overseen by the principal, Mr. Imthiyas. And he got all the support and the blessings from…

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Our new pre-school has been completed and has celebrated its grand opening!

Minerva Fernando reports:

The Taking-over Ceremony was a great moment. With a little crowd but in a grand way, Imthiyas had arranged it nicely. I advised him to have it in a very, very special way. The Board of Trustees and the Contractors, Tharanga Enterprises and our Special Guest Dr. Peter Seibert and myself were there. First we welcomed Our Special Guest. The first Pre-school Student welcomed him with a Garland of flowers. And then I, with a small…

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M.M. Imthiyas, our main teacher/principal for the pre-school and secretary of the "One Heart Educational Center":

Dear Martina


Already I inform to the parents in my village by notice to apply for the preschool (the notice is enclosed with this – 1) And the application also enclosed with this – 2) Also inform to under 13th children that we have plan to start computer class for them – 3) Now its Ramadan period. After the Ramadan that end of October we decide to call parents meeting and to make a enrollment For the children on that day…

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Excerpts of an e-mail from Minerva Fernando, our project coordinator in Sri Lanka:

My dearest Martina,

I visited Dickwella, the Pre-school is now completing. Herewith I am attaching some photos which I took on my recent visit. I met Imthiyas and he was very happy. Tharanga Enterprises will hand over the building by the end of this month. Tharanga Enterprises will paint the building, too. They have done an excellent job. Imthiyas told me that he would get the permission to close the well. He will build a wall…

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The construction of our new pre-school is moving along smoothly.

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On December 26, 2004, a major earthquake off the west coast of Northern Sumatra measuring 9.0 on the Richter scale triggered a massive flood wave (tsunami). According to official estimates, Sri Lanka suffered more than 30,000 confirmed fatalities. Sri Lanka is one of the countries in Southeast Asia worst affected by the tsunami. The catastrophe left a swath of destruction and hit the extremely poor areas along the Southern coast. Even before this catastrophe the basic facilities as well as public and private infrastructures in the rural areas of the south region were very underdeveloped.

In addition, as…

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An Emergency Care Unit has opened at Tangalle Hospital on October 17, 2007, and is served by 10 trained Nursing Officers. It is now possible to resuscitate trauma victims immediately. This already had and will have a major impact on the trauma management as well as the management of medical emergencies at the hospital. The next step now will be the implementation of an Intensive Care Unit. Nursing Officers and supporting staff are trained and ready to go. Medical Consultants are interviewed. This will further increase the kind and amount of surgeries possible. The autoclave is now operated…

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Dr. Karunaratne: "My main aim is to consolidate what we already have. With what we have at present, we can serve almost 90-95% of the population needs. The sustainability is what is necessary. This is mainly human resources and commitment."

"Our Minister of Health visited the hospital last month to discuss the hospital’s main shortcomings. He promised to provide additional nurses and doctors in the upcoming months. In addition to the 10 nurses we could add 3 months ago, 20 new nurses have arrived. We also have 6 additional doctors. They work in the…

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Awarding us a grant for our relief work in Sri Lanka and entering into a tsunami-relief partnership with RMF, Direct Relief International procured a Matachana High Pressure Steam Sterilizer, Model 1006 E-1 (valued at $70,000.00), from Premium International (Pvt) Ltd, Sri Lanka. This equipment was procured directly and delivered to the Operating Theater at the Tangalle Hospital.

Sterilizer Installation

Sterilizer Demonstration

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Rubina Mumtaz and I visited the Tangalle Hospital in March. The progress that has been made is fantastic. If I hadn't witnessed this hospital immediately after the tsunami, I would not believe it is the same hospital. It turned from a dilapidated and depressing facility into a 'Type A' Base Hospital. A massive increase of admissions, new doctors, and nurses has taken, and is taking place. Patients have new confidence and are using the hospital in unprecedented numbers. Doctors are now excited and eager to work at Tangalle Hospital. The overall value of this project exceeds US$1,000,000.00. And this…

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With immense gratitude and pleasure, we at the Real Medicine Foundation would like to thank Direct Relief International for awarding us the following grant for our relief work in Sri Lanka:

Direct Relief International will procure a Matachana High Pressure Steam Sterilizer, Model 1006 E-1, from Premium International (Pvt) Ltd, Sri Lanka (valued at $70,000). This equipment will be used in the Operating Theater Suite at the Tangalle District Hospital to ensure that quality health services are available for the long-term. It will be delivered to the Operating Theater at the Tangalle District Hospital by…

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Tangalle Children's Relay's accomplishments throughout the course of 2009 reflect our commitment to providing the best possible education for the children in our care. Our programs focus on:

Encouraging parental involvement in their children's education Ensuring the health and well-being of the children Providing meals to children of very poor families Modeling human values, reflecting kindness to others, sharing, and religious and ethnic tolerance Inviting interaction with other students to help develop social and interpersonal skills Developing the children's respect and appreciation for learning and for nature Alerting the children to the impact of natural disasters and…
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Sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Munaweera

The Minhath Preschool kids presented their activities and dance performances to make the occasion colorful.     

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'Ms. Cait', also from USA, is Real Medicine Foundation's Program Director India.  She made her first ever visit to Sri Lanka in November and visited us on the 19th. She was very fond of our kids and the preschool project. To see the smiles and hospitality offered here by the local community was heartwarming.    

Photo: Caitlin receives flowers from the children
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The children visited Yala National Park and historic Hindu and Buddhist temples in the Kataragama area.  

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Celebrating the children's creativity is central to reinforcing their individuality and makes for a happy day for all. 

As our chief invitee, Ms. Minerva Fernando, Real Medicine Foundation's Coordinator,  lights the oil lamp followed by the other guests. The kids started clapping to show their gratitude.
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The Special Tour Day for the children was filled with a visit to the park, the sea and Tangalle's main fishing village.  Many of the children's fathers are fishermen, however most of the children have never seen a boat.

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RMF Advisory Board member Mrs. Mali Munaweera visited Sri Lanka in July.  Originally from Sri Lanka and now living in Los Angeles, she returned to investigate how to support schools in her home country.  Tangalle Children's Relay was one of her first stops. The children welcomed her with warmly by offering flowers.                 

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To help the children learn more about the traditional market activities, they have their own market day each month.  They learn to handle money and describe the locally grown produce. 

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TCR continues to be a critical component of the well being of many post tsunami families living outside of Tangalle. With the support of RMF, TCR over the past year, in addition to education and meals for children has

Hosted a Kids art and craft work exhibition for year 2008 Hosted a Kid’s year end concert to demonstrate their learning skills. Renovated and fixed a new roof to our sand play house. Provided Medical Clinic for kids, other children and adults in the region. Initiated Recruitment of new kids for year 2009.

Photos: (L)…

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Real Medicine Foundation continues to provide salary support for the teachers at the Tangalle Children's Relay Pre-School in Tangalle. Each year, as more and more rural children pass through the school, TCR's role as a gateway to possibility and a bright future become clearer. Here is personal account from our Project Coordinator, Mrs. Minerva Fernando, who attended the school's year end celebration:

'When I reached the school hall it was 10am sharp. The parents and the children were there to greet me. I was thrilled at that moment and…

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Kids Become Their Favorite Profession

Photos: (L) Two businessmen selling vegetables; (R) The doctor examines and prescribes medicine for the sick child

Photos: (L) He is waiting for the next patient; (R) The house wife has visitors. She serves a delicious drink for her guests.

Photo: The school teacher has a hard time teaching math to her students.  

This activity makes the children believe that one day they can be of what they like to be. And it makes lots of fun.…

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In 2006 Real Medicine Foundation made initial contribution to Tangalle Infant Relay for an enclosed playground for the children that was safe from the road, dust and dirt that was caused by heavy traffic. Recently, Real Medicine announced its continued support for Mr. Mahendra Andrahennadige and his TIR project by providing salary support for his pre-school teachers. Providing employment is just one of the ways Real Medicine Foundation supports Sri Lankan communities. Please click here for the teacher profiles.

While many of the original classes were filled with tsunami affected children, those that come now…
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After the completion of two years, the children at Tangalle Pre-school and Kindergarten performed their skills and talents at this special event. It was held at Deepankara School Hall on December 14, 2007 at 2pm. The performances lasted nearly 4 hours. No special guests were invited for the event, but the teachers and parents of the children participated and organized this event very well. As it was a rainy day, the attendance was not as high as expected, but the rain did not affect the performance of the kids. The children’s parents and relatives were enthusiastic to see the…

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We visited the Day Care Center and Montessori School in Tangalle in March 2007 and were very impressed and happy to see what had been accomplished in just one year. In addition to their complete renovation and upgrading, Mahendra Andrahennedige has made his dream a reality and added a Hostel for 16 young girls, ages 16 and 17. This Hostel makes it possible for them to dedicate themselves to advanced education in Tangalle without having to travel many hours per day back and forth to the remote villages that are their homes. RMF has supported the renovation and upgrading…

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"As we understand, as human beings, our greatness lies, not so much in being able to remake the world, but to make the world a better place' By doing the best we can, for ourselves not, but for the needy, where it is needed'"

HISTORY:

On December 26, 2004 a massive underwater earthquake triggered a Tsunami that unleashed its natural terror, resulting in one of the most catastrophic, deadliest disasters known in the history of man.

Even several months after the Tsunami, we realized among the community in and around Tangalle, how many people were…

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The children of the Montessori Pre-school in Tangalle had a fair. They sold collections of their surroundings. The proceeds were deposited in their bank accounts, about Rupees 100 to 250 per child ($1 to $2.50).

 

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The Real Medicine team visited the Montessori pre-school NEW RAYS on Tissa Road in Tangalle on March 21, 2006. The children and their teachers had a beautiful "Welcome" prepared – including lotus flowers, leis and welcome songs.

And we had gifts as well (thank you so much to Lauren, Jade, Hana, DeeDee, Hailey, Annie & Elizah for your toy drives in California and New Hampshire – giving out stuffed animals and toys has become one of Real Medicine's beautiful traditions):

… and photo greetings from Annie & Elizah:

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On Wesak Day, Buddhists all over the world commemorate three great events: The birth, enlightenment and the passing away of Gautama Buddha. This sacred day is purely a religious festival, and not a festive occasion. On this day all Buddhists are expected to reaffirm their faith in the Buddha Dhamma and to lead a noble religious life. It is a day for meditation and for radiating Loving-Kindness.

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Tangalle is a small town in the south of Sri Lanka, where most families were affected by the tsunami of December 2004. The main income of the majority of the families is fishing. Some income is brought in through tourism for the families who live along the coastal line. The average monthly income is less than $30 for more than 75% of the families.

Today, more than a year after the tsunami, the situation is still difficult for many families; and the children are the ones who suffer most. As Tangalle is becoming the center…

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In addition to her new job, Dimuthu continues to assist Dr. Ranjith in our clinic in the Mawella camp, and she is doing a great job.

Thank you, Dimuthu, it is wonderful to have you! 

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Dimuthu has got a job as a computer operator at the work study department of the Miami Exports Garment Factory at Ranna. ( Hambanthota District.)

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The support of her vocational training has now landed her a job at the factory where she trained.

According to the Factory Manager, Dimuthu will receive Rs.4000.00- Rs.4500.00 per month starting salary. Her probation period is 6 months and after completion she will get an increment of Rs.1000.

After 2 years she will earn around Rs. 8000.00. (About $80 US)

This is a very good salary in Sri Lanka. Congratulations Dimuthu!

The letter below from her on January 18th, 2006, shows her progress and appreciation.

Dear Martina,

First of all I wish…

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A.P. Rohana is now 26 years old. He lives in Wadigala, Ranna, near Tangalle, Sri Lanka, with his mother and younger brother. With the carpentry tools he had received through the generous donation of Miller, Kaplan, Arase & Co., LLP in Los Angeles, he was able to re-start his career as a full-time carpenter. He considers this as a major turning point in his life, since he had lost his house, most of his belongings and his carpentry equipment in the tsunami of December 2004. In addition, he suffers from a hearing and speech disability.

With the income…

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Rohana is a deaf young man whose line of work is carpentry. Since he lost all of his equipment in the tsunami, he is seeking help to buy a set of carpentry tools. The whole set that would help him to provide for himself and his family again, would cost about US $700 including a multi-purpose saw machine. Your support is highly appreciated!

The accounting firm of Miller, Kaplan, Arase & Co., LLP in Los Angeles, took on the project of raising the funds for Rohana as part of their "MKA Miles" marketing game. In…

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“In Sri Lanka the cases of cancer have doubled in the last 10 years. More than half of the 10 million cases of cancer diagnosed come from developing countries where the cancer incidence is increasing dramatically.”
– International Atomic Energy Agency Report: A Silent Crisis: Cancer Treatment in Developing Countries

Cancer Situation, Existing Capability and Unmet Needs (IAEA PACT)

“Sri Lanka, a low-income country of nearly 20 million people, is typical of many areas of the developing world. Modest increases in life expectancy have led to a subsequent rise in the number of cancer cases.…

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Sri Lankan School Support

The Janadirya National Women Development Foundation had made us aware of two schools in the Hambantota district in Southern Sri Lanka. We met the principal and teachers of these two schools, and they introduced specifically those children to us, whose lives were changed forever by the tsunami.

Many of the breadwinners of families who live further inland had made the journey to the markets in the coastal cities on December 26, 2004, which was a Sunday and a holiday, and they were surprised and killed by the tsunami, leaving their broken families…

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Pallemalala is a small village in the Hambantota district in Southern Sri Lanka. The villagers' main income source is fishing. Due to the tsunami, many of the already very poor families have suffered major losses, both materially and emotionally.

The child care center now operates from this tent without furniture, with school children helping — see photos below.

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Countless Sri Lankans have lost loved ones and life as they knew it in the Tsunami, and there are still innumerable people who are suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome, and the emotional and psychological consequences of this disaster. We promised to provide continuous psychiatric and psychological support for the people in the Mawella camp and the adjacent villages, as well as for the Tangalle area.

STARR Inc. in Miami, Florida, had followed our work in the Mawella camp. They decided to fund the expenses for a psychiatrist for 2-3 visits a week for a two-year period. This…

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These photos were taken during Dr. Fuch's visit on June 16th, 2005, to the Powerloom Factory IDP Camp in Tangalle, on the south coast.

Martina is greeted by my smiling friends!

This camp has not been fortunate to be taken under the care of any large NGO. It is one of the 'missed' camps. Each of the 29 families here receives only 375 rupees a week from the Sri Lankan government, roughly $3.50 US and is at the mercy of passersby for all other donations.

This is the camp I worked at during…

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Now in its fourth year this program continues to take on a life of its own. Our intention was to implement two trainings for therapists at Navajeevana and the surrounding communities, but the massive facilities expansion at Navajeevana and the staff now working six days a week to meet the ever increasing demands made it difficult for us to carry out group instructions and interphase with their clinic operations. Our planned activities had to be postponed until next year.

We have managed to deliver the two Massage tables donated by Oakworks Massage Tables of New Freedom, PA, and…

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Our Real Medicine Team Whole Health Initiative to provide protocol enhancement trainings to physical therapists in Tangalle, Sri Lanka and serve out patient clinics was a tremendous success. The purpose of this initiative was to follow up last year's program at Navajeevana as part of our commitment of ongoing training for physical therapists and assistants in cost effective, progressive treatment protocols such as The Trager® Approach for chronic and Post Traumatic Stress pain, spasticity, and neuromuscular disorders. We also provided clinical sessions for Navajeevana as well as for Real Medicine Foundation's outpatient clinic at Yayawatta Village.

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Navajeevana Rehabilitation Center:

In addition to training two new therapists, a PT and an OT, a full review including more in depth material was provided to four of the remaining members of their staff that participated last year. Three have since left. We conducted two weekend long trainings as well as provided individual reviews. Our case study and other clinical sessions provided staff members with a variety of highly effective treatment approaches for conditions such as Ankylosing Spondylitis, Perio-arthritis and Polio which were not covered in the training sessions.

This year, Mr. Samantha Udagama…

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Many in the US are familiar with the effectiveness of therapeutic bodywork, movement education, acupuncture, yoga and massage in treating pain, relieving stress and addressing other psychological and physical trauma. However, these techniques that are so common here, have not widely reached abroad to countries like Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Indonesia, recently devastated by natural disasters and in need of effective affordable health care options.

While most relief organizations recognize the need for immediate medical care, many have not yet taken advantage of the long term benefits that cost effective holistic protocols can provide…

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I. BUILDING

The renovation and extension of the Peripheral Mother-Child Unit Thallala, Matara District, Sri Lanka is estimated and budgeted at approximately 12.500.000,- RS ($125,000.-)

FYI: 1.000,- Sri Lankan Rupees are equivalent to US$10.

II. EQUIPMENT

1. Children’s Ward (10 children)

10 children’s beds

(15.000,- RS/bed)

150.000,- RS

10 bedside tables

(7.000,- RS/bedside table)

70.000,- RS

2 beds for mothers for overnight stay

40.000,- RS

2-3 Nebulizers, miscellaneous instruments

800.000,- RS

Total Children’s Ward

1.060.000,- RS

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"Visiting the refugee camps which were established following the tsunami, we were regularly confronted with the insufficient medical supply at the camps as well as at the hospitals. The few hospitals, which had not been damaged or completely demolished by the tsunami, did not have enough capacity for all the injured people and were in urgent need of medicine and medical supply."

"Aside from the fact that the people in the Southern District do not even have the basic necessities in life anymore, there is an urgent need of upgrading the health sector in this area, especially regarding…

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Pediatrician for the Tangalle/Mawella area, Sri Lanka

The children's clinic we built in February/March 2005 was desperately needed, even before the tsunami. There is an extreme shortage of pediatricians in Sri Lanka, with only 120 pediatricians in the whole country and 2 in all of Southern Sri Lanka. The Tangalle district hospital doesn't have a pediatrician on staff.

We promised to provide continuous pediatric care for the children in the Mawella camp and the adjacent villages, as well as for the Tangalle area.

STARR, Inc. will provide for the salary for a pediatrician for 2…

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Seeing the poverty and sad conditions of the overwhelming majority of Sri Lanka's orphanages, we envisioned that there might be a possibility to work on elevating the situation of all orphanages in Sri Lanka. We decided to design an evaluation system to decide where help is needed the most.

Sylvia Hoebig of Real Medicine Asia in Sri Lanka, who had organized a large-scale disaster aid operation pursuant to the tsunami, has an overview over many orphanages in existence in Sri Lanka. She created the following Orphanages Rating System.

We will discuss…

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In 2005 Real Medicine’s Dr. Martina Fuchs initiated a growth hormone program to support Madumekala, a young girl of the age of 10 suffering from Panhypopituitarism. The success of this program has not only meant dramatic changes for Madumekala, below, whose growth now is more in line with her age, but also for many other children across the country who have been identified with similar conditions and are receiving treatment. For more information on this program or to sponsor a child, please visit our Ruhuna Medical College Growth Hormone Program Summary by clicking here.

In January…
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Madumekala is now a charming little girl. She always has a pleasant smile on her face. She is starting to look healthy and tall.

She visited the clinic at Karapitiya in Galle on the 11th of January. She will visit the clinic again on the 29th of this month. The efforts of Prof. Sujeewa Amarasena, Madumekala's Medical Consultant, are successful, including her regular visits and the continuous treatment. Prof. Sujeewa is very much pleased and satisfied with her progress.

Madumekala attends the school and she is now in seventh grade. Her mother takes more and more interest…

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Madumekala was started on hormone replacement therapy (hydrocortisone and thyroxine) at that time, but the parents could not afford the treatment with growth hormone ($450/month).

Real Medicine decided to support Madumekala’s treatment so that she would have a chance to reach an adult height and live a normal life. We were able to provide treatment for her starting in March 2005 for the entire upcoming year with the help of Care Sri Lanka (www.caresrilanka.com). Thank you!

Prof. Sujeewa Amaresena, the Head of the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Ruhuna in Galle, generously offered to oversee…

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Madumekala Udayawanthi Ubeywarna is now 12 years old and continues to do well under the treatment with Human Growth Hormone, gaining height and weight. Her family, having lost their house and all their possessions in the tsunami of December 2004, just moved out of the refugee camp, where we met her in February 2005 into a newly built village for 100 families, the I.S.P. Tsunami Village Yayawatta, Palapotha, Seenimodara, close to the city of Tangalle, Sri Lanka.

Madumekala visits the clinic at Karapitiya Hospital in Galle every two weeks with her mother to be seen by Prof. Sujeewa…

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Real Medicine Foundation Project Coordinator Mrs. Stephney Minerva Fernando and Real Medicine Foundation Accountant Mr. Nishantha Sadakelum participated in the trip to Ruhuna Medical College at Karapitiya Hospital on December 23rd along with patients Sachini, Madumekala and Tharindu, who were accompanied by relatives. They met with Mrs. Shanuki from Baurs Company and Professor Sujeewa and his assistant, Dr. Mrs. Priyanga Burhan.

Tharindu Hasanga

Real Medicine Foundation began providing support to Tharindu four years ago to treat his Familial Hypercholesterolemia, which if left untreated could be lead to cardiac arrest in early adulthood. Having…

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Tharindu has been receiving support and treatment from Real Medicine for 3 years now, for his condition, Familial Hypercholesterolemia, an autosomal dominant disorder that causes severe elevations in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc). Dr. Martina Fuchs met Tharindu shortly after the Tsunami in which he sadly lost his mother, Malani Muthumala, and his father, M.P. Chandana, a fisherman. Tharindu’s aunt, Ginta Muthumala, had taken on guardianship for him. Now 16 years old, Tharindu enjoys good health, performs well in school and looks to his future with confidence.

 

Translation of Tharindu’s Letter

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Tharindu Hasanga is an active boy. He is fifteen years old now. He goes to Seenimodara Junior School in Tangalle in Hambantota District. He lost his mother in the tsunami of December 2004, and now he and his only sister live with his aunt, Mrs. Jenita Muthumala. After this sad incident, Tharindu's aunt takes good care of Tharindu, because his father had married again.Tharindu is in tenth grade. He does his studies well. He likes to play with other school boys. He now, with the treatment, feels much better and not as tired anymore as he did before…

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Tharindu Hasanga is now visiting 9th grade at Seenimodara Junior School in Tangalle. He is very active and creative and gets good grades. The handicraft on the photo below, a living room decoration was created by him.

Tharindu continues to do well under the treatment with lipid lowering drugs. His aunt and guardian, Ginta Muthumala takes him to the clinic at Karapitiya Hospital in Galle once per month to see Prof. Sujeewa Amarasena, the Head of the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Ruhuna in Galle, who oversees his treatment. Prof. Amarasena provides his lab results…

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Tharindu is visiting the Karapitiya Hospital in Galle every month with his aunt and the Navaloka Hospital in Colombo every three months to guarantee the most effective treatment possible.

Here is Tharindu in March 2006, 14 years old, doing well under treatment, and growing into a tall young man:

Minerva Fernando, who oversees Real Medicine’s projects from our office in southern Sri Lanka, helps to coordinate Tharindu’s visits at the hospitals in Galle and Colombo, and his treatment with Crestor 10mg daily and Vit. E & C.

Tharindu’s medication…

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Tharindu Hasanga was presented to us in February 2005 at our Children’s clinic in the Mawella camp in southern Sri Lanka by one of his teachers at the Seenimodara Junior School in Tangalle. Tharindu was a 13-year-old boy at that time, suffering from Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH). Sadly, he had lost his mother, Malani Muthumala, in the tsunami, and his father, M.P. Chandana, a fisherman, was beside himself with grief over his loss. Tharindu’s aunt, Ginta Muthumala, had taken on guardianship for him.

FYI: Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disorder that causes severe elevations…

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RMF is providing the treatment with Human Growth Hormone for this child.

Report by Prof. Sujeewa Amarasena and Dr. Tikiri Gunawardana Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, Sri Lanka

Mohamed Farook Fazeer Ahamed is a ten-year-old boy who has been investigated for poor linear growth in the Paediatric Unit. His stature is significantly low according to age related norms and when compared to his genetic potential as evidenced by parental heights.

On investigation his growth hormone response to provocation tests is partially deficient thus confirming partial deficiency of…

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One such child that Real Medicine now sponsors, is Sachini. Sachini is actually a young woman of seventeen with all of the dreams of a bright future ahead. However Sachini’s life is different from other girls her age. Due to a growth hormone deficiency Sachini has the “bone age” of a ten year old. Graduating from High School presents enough challenges but having to live with this reality creates exponential stress. What makes her case more challenging is that because of her age, the window of time left for her to grow before puberty sets in is short. Therefore…

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On April 7, 2007, Anjali Mendis has undergone a successful Total Correction of Tetralogy of Fallot at Sri Jayawardenepura General Hospital in Nugegoda, Sri Lanka. Performing cardiothoracic surgeon was Dr. Aruna Kapuruge. Postoperatively, Anjali went into low output failure of the heart, requiring high inotropic support. She later also had to undergo peritoneal dialysis due to capillary leak syndrome and renal impairment. She had a lengthy stay at the ICU, but completely recovered from her surgery and was discharged on June 6, 2007.

Surgery Report

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Anjali Mendes and her mom, Lani Padmakanthi

Anjali Mendis is a 6-month-old girl with Tetralogy of Fallot, who urgently needs heart surgery.

Since Anjali’s parents cannot afford the surgery, we decided to cooperate on the costs with the Sri Lankan President Fund and Familien Nothilfe e.V. Sri Lanka.

Dr. Shirantha Arachchige will oversee the procedure.

FYI: Tetralogy of Fallot is the most common form of cyanotic congenital heart disease. Cyanosis is the abnormal bluish discoloration of the skin that occurs because of low levels of circulating oxygen in the blood. Tetralogy…

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We met Dinithi Uththara and her parents at the clinic in the Mawella camp. Dinithi is a 14-months-old girl who was born with a complete atrioventricular septal defect. She has a healthy twin sister. Dinithi's parents approached us for help.

FYI: Atrioventricular septal defect is a rare heart defect that is present at birth (congenital). The normal heart has four chambers. Two chambers are called atria, which are separated from each other by a partition called the atrial septum. The other two chambers, known as ventricles, are also separated by a septum. Valves connect the atria…

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D.V. Sanali Yehansa and her parents visited us in Tangalle, Sri Lanka, on March 25. Sanali's recovery after her cardiac surgery in May 2005 was without complications. Sanali is now a vivacious, healthy and beautiful little girl. On March 25, she was exactly 2 years and 4 months old. We are very happy for Sanali, and wish her and her family all the best!

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15-months-old D.V. Sanali Yehansi had a large atrial septal defect, with a large left to right shunt and moderate pulmonary hypertension.

 

FYI: Atrial septal defects are a group of rare heart defects that are present at birth (congenital). The normal heart has four chambers with two upper chambers known as atria. They are separated from each other by a fibrous partition known as the atrial septum. The two lower chambers are known as ventricles and are separated from each other by the ventricular septum. Valves connect the atria (left and right) to their respective ventricles.…

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It is beautiful to see that today, more than one year after we established it, our clinic keeps blossoming and serving the families in the area that have been severely affected by the tsunami. Dr. Ranjith, supported by his assistant Dimuthu, visits the clinic twice a week, it is a fixture in the community, and as I could personally witness: Long lines show how much it is needed. Today, more than one year after the tsunami, many of the families are still living in the refugee camp. We will continue to support the clinic long-term and will establish more…

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After supporting our earthquake relief efforts in Pakistan and visiting projects in India, Real Medicine's Dr. Fabian Toegel stops by our clinic in the Mawella camp – greeted by the children!

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Our clinic continues to thrive in the hands of Dr. Ranjith, who divides his time between the Tangalle hospital and the clinic. He sees patients twice a week.

 

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From Martina Fuchs in Mawella, Sri Lanka

Hi everybody! This is the third update for my stay here in Sri Lanka and an outlook into our future plans for RealMedicine. Our network and support system has grown exponentially within Europe and the U.S. – words cannot express my gratitude to all of you who make the magic happen.

The extent of destruction through the tsunami here in Sri Lanka doesn't cease to be shocking to me. Basically, the whole coastline around this island country is in ruins, hundreds of meters from the ocean further inland. And…

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LATEST NEWS from Dr. Martina Fuchs

February 20, 2005 From Martina Fuchs in Mawella, Sri Lanka

Hi everybody, here I am again, with the next chapter from Sri Lanka. So much had happened, it alomst feels like a lifetime in itself.

First: A million thank you's! Thank you for all your e-mails and contributions and thank you for being so incredbily supportive and encouraging! It means the world to me since the need and despair here sometimes do get overwhelming. I am so grateful to have this amazing network of wonderful people in Europe and…

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From Martina Fuchs in Mawella, Sri Lanka First: Thank you, thank you, thank you to all the wonderful people who made it possible for us to be here, you are helping to make a huge difference in the lives of many, many people here in Sri Lanka! And an especially big thank you to you, Jan, your foresight and generosity made and is making all the difference.

Arriving in the early morning of February 5 via Taiwan, Province of China and Singapore, it took me a couple of days to get an overview over the medical situation here in…

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Palisadian 8-Year-Old Sends Joy to Sri Lanka Children by Natalie Nelson Palisadian Post, Thursday, August 4, 2005

It is almost impossible to imagine the scene of the tsunami that hit Southeast Asia last December 26. The chaos that unfolded was inconceivable, and the rebuilding projects are still in the beginning stages, seven months later.

After learning about the orphans, the homeless and the unemployed people who were greatly affected by the tsunami, 8-year-old Jade Brenner-Katz knew that she needed to do her part.

"I'm lucky to have a great life and I want to help…

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