Real Medicine Foundation - Pakistan News and updates from Pakistan http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/ 2018-06-05T13:26:33-07:00 Winter Relief Supplies and Healthcare Services Distributed to Thousands: January-March 2018 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2018/06/05/winter-relief-and-health-services-for-returning-idps/ 2018-06-05T13:26:33-07:00 2018-06-05T11:10:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> Dr. Rubina Mumtaz info@realmedicinefoundation.org MHM Research Presented at SACOSAN 7: April 10 and 12, 2018 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2018/04/12/mhm-research-presented-at-sacosan-7-april-10-2018/ 2018-04-30T11:36:36-07:00 2018-04-12T18:00:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> Afshan Bhatti and Deanna Boulard info@realmedicinefoundation.org Breaking a Cultural Barrier: March 2018 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2018/03/07/breaking-a-cultural-barrier-march-2018/ 2018-03-08T11:39:12-08:00 2018-03-07T11:00:00-08:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p><img alt="" src="/assets/5aa041d740780805d0124b20/m_photo/IMG_5636.jpg" /></p> <h5><strong>Background</strong></h5> <p>RMF&rsquo;s menstrual hygiene management (MHM) work in Pakistan manifests in a myriad of unique ways. Our winterization project, <strong>funded by LDS Charities</strong>, aims to <strong>support and rehabilitate internally displaced persons</strong> (IDPs) returning to District Swat during the bitter winter months. As part of our winterization package, we include an MHM kit developed according to UNICEF Dignity Kit Guidance. The number of kits required for each family was evaluated in a dignified manner during a <strong>face-to-face interview by RMF monitoring and evaluation staff with the families</strong>. The contents of each MHM kit include sanitary napkins, cotton underwear, soap, and green tea. During distribution of the packages, recipients were often the men of the family, and accepting MHM kits in a public manner was a first for them.&nbsp;</p><br /> <img alt="" src="/assets/5aa041d740780805c458d5fc/m_photo/IMG_5635.jpg" /> <h5><strong>A New Conversation </strong></h5> <p>An interesting development arising from the introduction of MHM kits to these homes was that it <strong>allowed the doors to open for communication within families</strong>. Mrs. Najeed Khan, in a private conversation held on RMF&rsquo;s health clinic premises, said that for the first time, the topic of menstruation was discussed with her husband when she told him that they needed more sanitary napkins, as one of their daughters had heavy bleeding days. Such a topic would have been taboo in their household just a few months ago. The men of the family typically do not want to hear any details of such &ldquo;woman issue&rdquo; topics, especially when it comes to discussing their daughters, and consider it too embarrassing to acknowledge.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The most refreshing aspect was Mr. Najeeb&rsquo;s response. Not only was he willing to hear out the topic, but also was questioning how sanitary napkins are better than reusable strips of cloth. For the first time in his life, he went to find out the cost of sanitary napkins to see how much it would affect the monthly budget if they were to indulge in regular purchase. So today, the Khan household has <strong>broken the cultural barrier of communication on the taboo topic of menstruation</strong>.&nbsp;</p><br /> <img alt="" src="/assets/5aa0424023f812060701cfee/m_photo/Son_and_Father_Receive_MHM.png" /><br /> &nbsp; Dr. Rubina Mumtaz and Afshan Bhatti info@realmedicinefoundation.org Supplies and Health Services Benefit a Young Family: March 2018 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2018/03/07/supplies-and-health-services-benefit-a-young-family-march-2018/ 2018-03-08T11:38:10-08:00 2018-03-07T11:00:00-08:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p><strong><img alt="" src="/assets/5aa03f0f23f812060701cfe6/m_photo/IMG_5631.jpg" /></strong></p> <h5><strong>Returning Home in Winter</strong></h5> <p>Sughra Bibi, 31, was pregnant when she returned home after having spent two years living in a tent in the IDP camp at Nowshera. She came holding the little hands of her 4-year-old son and 9-year-old daughter, heart heavy with apprehension at the thought of eking out an existence in the bitter winter cold of their village home, high in the mountains of Chatekal. Once, not too long ago, this beautiful village had been in the vicelike grip of the Taliban with their horrendous laws, forcing Sughra&rsquo;s family to flee and leave behind land that had been in the family for generations. Today, by the grace of Allah as she eloquently put it, Sughra was home.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> RMF has been able to make Sughra&rsquo;s life more bearable. The cold she was dreading became tolerable with the <strong>warm clothes, blankets, and the monthly supply of coal</strong> from the RMF winterization program. Warm food on the table was a solace to the young family, as it meant that her husband did not have to leave for the towns to labor, at least for the few months of winter.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><img alt="" src="/assets/5aa03f0f23f81205e6399b81/m_photo/IMG_5620.jpg" /></strong></p> <h5><strong>A Safe Delivery</strong></h5> <p>The most important support Sughra received was from the <strong>Lady Health Visitor (LHV)</strong> in the RMF clinic in Chatekal, who provided the care needed for Sughra&rsquo;s last trimester of pregnancy. Sughra wanted to deliver within the sanctity of her home, as is the tradition, so our LHV was the birth attendant who delivered Zarak Khan, a happy, healthy 7-pound baby boy. It was a straightforward, uncomplicated delivery. This baby is Sughra&rsquo;s fourth child (she lost a child during the crisis period when they were IDPs). Both mother and child were doing very well when the RMF team visited them a couple of days later. This deeply devout couple called RMF angels in disguise, sent to them as <em>an answer to all their prayers</em>.&nbsp;</p><br /> <img alt="" src="/assets/5aa03f0f23f81205f2086adc/m_photo/IMG_5629.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp; Dr. Rubina Mumtaz and Afshan Bhatti info@realmedicinefoundation.org Relief Goods Distributed: December 2017 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2018/01/30/winter-relief-and-health-services-for-returning-idps/ 2018-03-20T13:45:27-07:00 2018-01-30T07:00:00-08:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p>Pakistan has an existing service delivery project in District Swat, KPK composed of a healthcare hub clinic in the village of Nagoha, UC Barikot that offers comprehensive primary health care, inclusive of routine pathology investigations and ultrasound services. It links to and acts as a referral point for our new semi-mobile outreach satellite clinic that offers basic primary healthcare services. The hub clinic is also operating as the field base camp for the winterization project, providing space for office staff and storage of supplies.</p> <h4>Implementation Protocol</h4> <h5>Registration of Repatriating Families</h5> <p>Registration of the returning IDP families and assessment of their immediate needs on a case-by-case basis was the main activity of the first implementation phase. The sites finalized were seven villages in four union councils of the tehsils Matta and Khweza Khela:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Baranavi and Dabargai, UC Madyan</p></li> <li> <p>Bashigran, UC Bashigran</p></li> <li> <p>Sattal, Tangoon, and Ayeen Ashoka, UC Bahrain</p></li> <li> <p>Chatekal, UC Beha</p></li> </ul> &nbsp; <h5>Scouting for Vulnerable Families</h5> <p>This was carried out with the help of local community leaders and UC councilors. They identified poor and vulnerable families who had repatriated within the previous 2&ndash;3 months and who did not have extended family networks to cushion their initial resettlement. Criteria included:&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> <p>Repatriation from IDP host site within the previous 2&ndash;3 months</p></li> <li> <p>Preference given to female-headed households</p></li> <li> <p>Family includes young children and elderly members</p></li> <li> <p>Monthly income less than or equal to Rs15,000/- (US$150)</p></li> </ul> &nbsp;<strong>The total number of families was finalized at 162.</strong> <p><img alt="" src="/assets/5a70972d40780805d007995e/SwatFamily.jpg" /></p> <h5><br /> Inventory of Relief Items</h5> <p>A detailed needs assessment of each registered family was conducted at the time of registration, which varied slightly from family to family. The amended list of relief goods included the following elements:&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;<br /> <strong>Non-perishable Food Rations</strong><strong>&nbsp;</strong><br /> One RMF food ration package is enough to feed a family of 7&ndash;8 people for one month. Each food package includes these items:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Flour 40 kg</p></li> <li> <p>Rice 20 kg</p></li> <li> <p>Cooking oil 5 kg</p></li> <li> <p>Tea 1 kg</p></li> <li> <p>Powdered milk 2 kg</p></li> <li> <p>Sugar 5 kg</p></li> <li> <p>Lentils 10 kg</p></li> <li> <p>Spices/salt &ndash; 1 packet o Matchboxes &ndash; 1 packet each&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p></li> </ul> <p><strong>Coal</strong>&nbsp;<br /> Our needs assessment found that cooking utensils were not a requirement. A majority of repatriating families brought back these supplies from their host camps. However, fuel for heating and cooking was a dire need. The popular source of fuel was coal, a locally available commodity.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <strong>Shelter</strong>&nbsp;<br /> At the initial stage, we proposed that winterized tents be issued to families whose houses were uninhabitable. For those families whose houses were still standing but required minor repairs to make them habitable, the same budget would be used for repairs. Fortunately, our needs assessment survey showed that neither was required, as most of the families had made their homes habitable. However, for the oncoming winter, the floor surfaces required waterproof floor mats and carpets. In addition to floor weatherproofing and insulation, warm blankets were issued at the rate of 2&ndash;5 king-sized blankets per family, depending on the family size.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <strong>Warm Clothing</strong><br /> Clothing for the families; mainly warm coats, hats, socks, and gloves; was procured based on each family&rsquo;s specific needs. This involved a fine detailing of each family member and his or her size.<br /> <br /> <strong>Family Hygiene Kits</strong>&nbsp;<br /> The composition of the family hygiene kit is based on Sphere Guidelines and UNICEF WASH requirements. One kit per family (up to seven family members) was determined as best practice. As with the clothing exercise, the family hygiene kits were also customized according to each family&rsquo;s size and needs. The components of the family kit are as follows:</p> <ul> <li> <p>2 large towels (per family of 4; increased according to the family size)</p></li> <li> <p>1 kg laundry soap (per family of 4; increased according to family size)</p></li> <li> <p>4 bars of antibacterial body soap (per family of 6; increased according to family size)</p></li> <li> <p>1 hairbrush and comb</p></li> <li> <p>1 nail clipper o 100 ml toothpaste (per family of 4; increased according to family size)</p></li> <li> <p>Toothbrushes (one for each family member)&nbsp;</p></li> </ul> <p><strong>Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) Kits</strong><br /> The MHM kits, developed according to UNICEF Dignity Kit Guidance, were issued according to the number of menstruating women in each family, at one kit per menstruating woman per month. The number required for each family was evaluated in a dignified manner during the face-to-face interview by RMF Pakistan&rsquo;s M&amp;E staff with the families. The composition of the MHM kit is as follows:&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> <p>2 pieces of cotton underwear&nbsp;</p></li> <li> <p>1 packet of 12 disposable sanitary napkins&nbsp;</p></li> <li> <p>1 bar of soap for handwashing</p></li> <li> <p>250 g of green tea&nbsp;</p></li> </ul> <p><strong><img alt="" src="/assets/5a70982640780805d0079a90/FoodPackages.jpg" /></strong></p><img alt="" src="https://photos.smugmug.com/Asia/Pakistan/Swat-Winterization-Project/i-fZtBLbk/0/07b481af/L/Winterization-L.jpg" /> <h5><br /> Distribution</h5> <p>The first distribution took place in a 3-day exercise from December 6, 2017 to December 9, 2017, well before the first snowfall. The modus operandi for distribution was based on union council location.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> The total number of beneficiary families were 60 from UC Bahrain, 5 from UC Bashigran, 11 from UC Madyan and 86 from UC Beha.&nbsp;</p><br /> <img alt="" src="/assets/5a70992723f81205e617f672/Distribution1.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <img alt="" src="/assets/5a70992723f81205f20356a7/Distribution2.jpg" /> Dr. Rubina Mumtaz info@realmedicinefoundation.org Clinic Works to Provide for Those with Limited Access to Health Care: April-June 2017 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2017/11/04/clinic-works-to-provide-for-those-with-limited-access-to-health-careapril-june-2017/ 2018-01-25T08:13:29-08:00 2017-11-04T16:00:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p>The 5th morbidity report covers a three-month period: April 1st to June 30th, 2017. Although the larger Swat Earthquake Relief Project came to an official close in the first week of March 2017, the <strong>community requested that <span class="caps">RMF</span> continue our healthcare services</strong>. Since the vast majority of area residents are poor and vulnerable, with limited access to health care, a board <strong>decision was made to continue the health clinic in Swat</strong>. The clinic was relocated and opened in its current location, the village of Nagoha in Union Council Barikot, at the end of March.</p> <p>The daily clinic operating hours are from <strong>8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday to Saturday</strong>. Sunday is a day off and Friday is a half-day, in line with religious demand for Friday afternoon prayers, which are considered sacred.</p> <p><br></p> <h5>Health Clinic Site</h5> <p>Our approach in choosing the clinic site for this project has been needs-based, as <strong>this service is more focused on people in need</strong>, irrespective of their experience in the earthquake. Thus, the modus operandi for our clinic has been semi-stationary, moving from site to site according to our assessment of need in different localities within the same district. As a result, the equipment, machinery, and accompanying paraphernalia of the clinical setup have been kept to a minimum, <strong>allowing us to move easily and swiftly</strong>. In the past year and a half, since December 2015, we have worked in <strong>five different remote villages</strong>:</p> <ul> <li>Laloo Bandee, Union Council Bandai</li> <li>Takhta Banda, Union Council Odigram</li> <li>Odigram, Union Council Odigram</li> <li>Balogram, Union Council Odigram</li> <li>Nagoha, Union Council Barikot</li> </ul> Dr. Rubina Mumtaz, Country Director info@realmedicinefoundation.org Health Clinic to Continue after Relief Project Ends: January 2017 – March 2017 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2017/05/12/health-clinic-to-continue-after-relief-project-ends-january-2017-march-2017/ 2017-10-23T08:22:34-07:00 2017-05-12T06:00:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p>The 4th morbidity report covers a two-month period: January 1st to February 28th, 2017, as the <strong>Swat Earthquake Relief Project came to an official close in the first week of March 2017</strong>. A formal closing event took place on March 18th, 2017. During interactions with the community on this occasion, <span class="caps">RMF</span> was requested to continue our healthcare services, as the vast majority of area residents are poor and vulnerable with limited access to health care. A board <strong>decision was made to continue the health clinic in Swat</strong>. Thus, at the end of March, we moved to our 5th location, the village of Nagoha in Union Council Barikot.</p> <p>The daily clinic operating hours are from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday to Saturday. Sunday is a day off and Friday is a half-day, in line with religious demand for Friday afternoon prayers, which are considered sacred.</p> <p><br></p> <h5>Health Clinic Site</h5> <p>Our approach in <strong>choosing the clinic site for this project has been needs-based</strong>, as this service is more focused on people in need, irrespective of their experience in the earthquake. Thus, the modus operandi for our clinic has been semi-stationary, <strong>moving from site to site according to our assessment of need in different localities within the same district</strong>. As a result, the equipment, machinery, and accompanying paraphernalia of the clinical setup have been kept to a minimum, allowing us to move easily and swiftly. In the past year since December 2015, we have worked in five different remote villages:</p> <ol> <li>Laloo Bandee, Union Council Bandai</li> <li>Takhta Banda, Union Council Odigram</li> <li>Odigram, Union Council Odigram</li> <li>Balogram, Union Council Odigram</li> <li>Nagoha, Union Council Barikot</li> </ol> Dr. Rubina Mumtaz, Country Director info@realmedicinefoundation.org MHM Research Study in Sindh, Pakistan is Complete: January-April 2017 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2017/05/11/mhm-research-study-in-sindh-pakistan-is-complete/ 2017-05-23T08:28:16-07:00 2017-05-11T16:00:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> <img alt="" src="/assets/5914fa4dedb2f31efa2147ba/m_photo/IMG_0684.jpg" /> <h4>Completion of MHM Research Study in Sindh, Pakistan<strong>&nbsp;</strong></h4> Our <strong>Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM)</strong> research study launched in the Province of Sindh in December 2016 <strong>came to a successful close</strong> by February 2017. This UNICEF-funded study was part of the continuation of nationwide MHM research conducted by RMF in close collaboration with (and based in the methodology of) Professor Marni of Columbia University, New York. The key outcome of the study findings is to develop the <strong>Pakistan Girls&rsquo; Puberty Book</strong>, which is a natural next step to UNICEF&rsquo;s research and interventions in Menstrual Health Management in Pakistan since 2012. This research also forms part of UNICEF&rsquo;s global WinS/MHM project that aims to strengthen evidence-based advocacy of MHM in <strong>10 different countries</strong>. <h5><br /> Research Methodology</h5> As is the normal procedure, we first had to obtain a no-objection certificate (NOC) from the Sindh Ministry of Education, whose members proved to be very cooperative in issuing the document. They also identified the two districts that were safe for us in terms of the security protocols for our team of researchers. The data collection methodology included three strategic approaches: <ul> <li>Ethnographic observations</li> <li>Key informant interviews with adults</li> <li>Participatory group activities with adolescent young women aged 10&ndash;19</li> </ul> The next step was identification of one rural and one urban girls&rsquo; school. The rural district identified was <strong>Khairpur</strong>, and a government girls&rsquo; high school was randomly selected. After an observation checklist for the school was carried out, four groups of schoolgirls and one group of out-of-school girls were subjects for participatory group activities. Four interviews with key stakeholders of the community were also conducted, bringing the <strong>total number of participants to 62.</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> The urban component was a government girls&rsquo; high school in District Hyderabad. The same methodology was applied, and led to <strong>65 participants</strong>, including 4 groups of schoolgirls, 1 group of out-of-school girls, and 4 interviews with community leaders and key stakeholders.&nbsp; <h5><br /> Progress on the Pakistan Girls&rsquo; Puberty Book&nbsp;</h5> The data collected is undergoing transcription and analysis. The Pakistan Girls&rsquo; Puberty Book is currently in the <strong>illustration phase</strong>. It is expected that the study&rsquo;s final results will be ready to be presented in a knowledge dissemination seminar<strong> by the end of May</strong>.&nbsp;<a name="_GoBack"></a><br /> <br /> &nbsp; Dr. Rubina Mumtaz info@realmedicinefoundation.org Phase II Housing Reconstruction Project Ends: October 2016 – March 2017 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2017/05/04/phase-ii-housing-reconstruction-project-end-october-2016-march-2017/ 2017-05-04T19:55:26-07:00 2017-05-04T07:00:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p>The reconstruction phase was officially launched in mid-June 2016. Based on our survey, and with technical assistance from an architectural firm, <strong>a model house plan was designed</strong> based on the vernacular architecture of the area and using locally manufactured construction materials.</p> <p>Batches of <strong>4–5 houses were contracted out simultaneously</strong>, following <span class="caps">RMF</span> protocols for the project. 19 houses had been completely destroyed and were reconstructed according to the model house design, modified on a case-by-case basis. A total of 22 houses were identified as partially damaged and repaired according to the needs of the resident family. An orphanage housing 70 young boys was also partially damaged due to the earthquake, rendering an entire dormitory uninhabitable and the dining hall unusable. Repairs carried out at the orphanage were nearly equivalent to the budget of 3 repair case houses. Hence, our proposed target, <strong>the reconstruction and repair of 44 houses</strong>, was successfully met within 9 months and concluded with a formal handing over and closing ceremony titled “Celebrating Success with Communities” on March 18th, 2017.</p> Dr. Rubina Mumtaz, Country Director info@realmedicinefoundation.org Serving Multiple Communities in the District: September 2016 – December 2016 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2017/03/14/health-clinic-third-morbidity-report/ 2017-10-23T08:23:15-07:00 2017-03-14T07:00:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p>The health clinic has been operational for a little over a year: December 16th, 2015 to December 31st, 2016. It has been located in 4 different villages, all within the same district of Swat. The changes of location mean that we have been <strong>serving different communities</strong>, but since all come from the same cultural, socioeconomic, and geographical background, the morbidity patterns and <strong>statistics have remained quite consistent</strong>, with the expected seasonal variations.</p> <p>Over the course of this year, <strong>we have provided a total of 8,525 patients with primary health care and maternal and child health care</strong>. The majority of our patients were:</p> <ul> <li>48% &#8211; 4,099 children (2,125 boys and 1,974 girls)</li> <li>40.7% &#8211; 3,473 women</li> <li>11.3% &#8211; 953 Men</li> </ul> <p>Out of these 8,525 patients, 5,812 sought primary healthcare services (<span class="caps">PHC</span>) and 3,204 women and children benefitted from maternal child healthcare services (<span class="caps">MCH</span>).</p> Dr. Rubina Mumtaz, Country Director info@realmedicinefoundation.org RMF To Continue Operations Despite Repatriation: Q4 2016 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2017/03/10/rmf-to-continue-operations-despite-repatriation-q4-2016/ 2017-07-20T11:42:23-07:00 2017-03-10T16:00:00-08:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p>Real Medicine Foundation is part of a team of local and international NGOs who are supporting the government of Pakistan in tackling the challenge of <strong>internally displaced population</strong>, which has been a chronic challenge plaguing the country since 2004.</p> <p>Internal displacement has affected an <strong>estimated 20 million people</strong> within Pakistan since 2004 due to military conflict, sectarian violence, and human rights abuse. The <span class="caps">IDP</span> problem was further aggravated by natural disasters, such as the 2005 earthquake and the 2010 floods.</p> <p><span class="caps">WHO</span> is responsible for addressing the pressure on the healthcare system, and leads a cluster of health-oriented NGOs to fill the gaps in service delivery. As part of this cluster, <strong><span class="caps">RMF</span> has been providing high quality, free mother and child health (<span class="caps">MCH</span>) primary health care to <span class="caps">IDP</span> women and children</strong> in Union Council Taru Jabba, District Nowshera since December 2013. Our <span class="caps">MCH</span> clinic operation is being successfully conducted to date. <br /> <br /></p> <h5>Update on <span class="caps">IDP</span> Situation</h5> <p>According to the latest <span class="caps">OCHA</span> repatriation reports of December 2016, a total of <strong>227,843 families have been successfully repatriated</strong> back to their homes. These are estimated to be 75% of the total families that were displaced. <br /> <br /></p> <h5>Adapting Strategy</h5> <p>With the reducing <span class="caps">IDP</span> population, the pressure on the healthcare system has lessened, and <span class="caps">WHO</span> has announced a reduced urgency of additional healthcare services by cluster NGOs. RMF’S <span class="caps">MCH</span> center in Taru Jabba has two key components that make its services valuable despite the changing face of the situation: it is the only primary level healthcare facility in the Union Council of Taru Jabba that <strong>provides pathology lab services for routine investigations and ultrasound services</strong>. By virtue of these two services, patients are referred to our center by other healthcare facilities, including some private practitioners, making this a valuable addition to the healthcare service infrastructure of the union council.</p> <p><span class="caps">RMF</span> Pakistan has decided that we should <strong>continue our operations</strong> in this area for as long as we are needed, but with key changes to the operations. In August 2016, we began to include a small token fee for the above two services, as well as an <span class="caps">OPD</span> consultation fee. However, given that the average income of the local region is well below the poverty line, <strong>only those who can afford to pay are subject to these token fees.</strong></p> RMF info@realmedicinefoundation.org MHM Research Study Launched in Sindh, Pakistan http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2016/12/30/mhm-research-study-launched-in-sindh-pakistan/ 2017-05-23T08:05:51-07:00 2016-12-30T18:00:00-08:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p><br/></p> <h5>Background</h5> <p><span class="caps">RMF</span> Pakistan’s Menstrual Hygiene Management (<span class="caps">MHM</span>) research studies conducted in the provinces of Punjab and Balochistan in conjunction with Columbia University, New York have been a success. <strong>The key outcome of the studies’ findings is to develop the Pakistan Girls’ Puberty Book.</strong> For this book to be applicable to the diverse cultural landscapes of Pakistan, it is imperative that data from the provinces of <span class="caps">KPK</span> and Sindh be added to the book.</p> <p>Therefore, the same research protocol is now being replicated in the province of Sindh. This research expansion has been funded by <span class="caps">UNICEF</span>, and the aim of this extension is to collect data to include the diverse social and cultural norms and practices of the country.</p> Dr. Rubina Mumtaz info@realmedicinefoundation.org Decrease in Services: Morbidity and Progress Report August-September 2016 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2016/11/27/august-september-2016/ 2017-07-19T13:23:04-07:00 2016-11-27T16:45:00-08:00 [ Read more...]]]> <h4>Update on Internally Displaced Persons (<span class="caps">IDP</span>) Situation</h4> <p>The government’s stance on IDPs was always immediate attention and provision of IDPs’ basic necessities while displaced, with the ultimate goal of voluntary and safe repatriation to their homes.</p> <p>According to the latest Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (<span class="caps">OCHA</span>) repatriation reports of August 2016, a total of <strong>179,174</strong> families have been successfully repatriated back to their homes, leaving behind a total of <strong>124,617</strong> families who are still displaced. According to official sources, the cut-off date for the return of all IDPs is December 2016.</p> <h4>Proposed Changes</h4> <p>Given that the <span class="caps">IDP</span> population is reducing, the urgency of the need for a <span class="caps">MCH</span> center has lessened, because the government’s health infrastructure is slowly strengthening itself and is getting back on its feet to handle the reduced burden of healthcare demand.</p> <p>RMF’s Maternal and Child Health Centre (<span class="caps">MCH</span>) in Taru Jabba has two key components that make its services valuable despite the changing face of the situation:</p> <ul> <li>It is the only primary level healthcare facility in the Union Council of Tarru Jabba that provides pathology lab services for routine investigations and ultrasound services.</li> <li>By virtue of these two services, patients are referred to our center by other healthcare facilities, including some private practitioners, making this a valuable addition to the healthcare service infrastructure of the union council.</li> </ul> <p><span class="caps">RMF</span> policymakers have decided that we should <strong>continue our operations in this area for at least one more year.</strong></p> <p>Proposed changes have been to include a <strong>small token fee</strong> for the above two services as well as an <strong><span class="caps">OPD</span> consultation fee</strong>.</p> <p>However, given that the average income of the local region is well below the poverty line, these token fees will be subject to <strong>only those who can afford to pay.</strong></p> Rubina Mumtaz info@realmedicinefoundation.org RMF Research Manager Presents at the 5th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2016/11/01/rmf-research-manager-presents-at-the-5th-annual-virtual-conference-on-menstrual-hygiene-management/ 2017-05-17T13:57:47-07:00 2016-11-01T07:00:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p><strong>Ms. Afshan Bhatti, our Research Manager in Pakistan, presented our UNICEF poster on our research on MHM in Pakistan at the 5th Annual MHM Conference that took place in New York on October 26, 2016.</strong><br /> <br /> &quot;The <a href="https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/public-health-now/events/5th-annual-virtual-conference-menstrual-hygiene-management-mhm-wash-schools">5th Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management</a> (MHM) in WASH in Schools (WinS) will focus on the voices of girls&rsquo; captured globally to guide action and political commitments. This year&rsquo;s presentations come from a range of countries, including Nepal, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Kyrgyzstan and Kenya! They will highlight examples of directly capturing girls&rsquo; voices on MHM barriers and proposed solutions, initiatives that translate girls&rsquo; expressed needs into actionable programming or strategic shifts in education, and WASH policies including indicators to capture measurable change. Participants can attend online from anywhere and participate live with comments and questions! This conference is organized by Columbia University&rsquo;s Mailman School of Public Health and UNICEF.&quot;&nbsp;</p><br /> <img alt="" src="/assets/591c52d0a0b5dd20942557ce/Afshan_Bhatti_at_New_York_Conference.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 800px;" /><br /> &nbsp; RMF info@realmedicinefoundation.org Phase II Housing Reconstruction Begins: June 2016 - September 2016 http://realmedicinefoundation.org/initiative-reports/pakistan/archives/2016/10/13/swat-earthquake-relief-project-phase-ii-housing-reconstruction-first-progress-report/ 2017-03-08T12:49:41-08:00 2016-10-13T11:00:00-07:00 [ Read more...]]]> <p>On October 26, 2015, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake hit the Hindu Kush region of Afghanistan. Due to the depth of the earthquake, the damage caused by its otherwise powerful tremors was controlled. However, the main quake was followed by 87 aftershocks, which along with the winter rains and snowfall, triggered a series of landslides in these mountainous regions, causing weakly structured houses built on hill slopes to collapse. According to <span class="caps">NDMA</span> reports, more than 100,000 houses were destroyed, rendering nearly 600,000 people homeless or living in makeshift shelters. <br /> <br/> <strong>After completing Phase I of our relief plan (objectives I-<span class="caps">III</span>: immediate relief shelter, food, and health care), <span class="caps">RMF</span> has begun Phase II of the project objectives: To assist in rebuilding destroyed homes.</strong><br /> <br/> The target population for Phase II is <strong>44 households</strong> (approximately 500 men, women, and children). The project site is Tehsil Matta and Tehsil Saidu Shariff of District Swat. After obtaining permission/documentation from the relevant authorities, Phase II was <strong>officially launched on June 13th, 2016</strong>.</p> Dr. Rubina Mumtaz info@realmedicinefoundation.org