Nepal: Orphanage Support

Supporting Care for Orphans and those with Special Needs: February 1 - July 31, 2016

September 30, 2016
Suman Gurung


Summary of Activities

RMF continues to provide Nepal Children’s Organization (NCO) with 2 resident nurses, who stay at NCO’s 4 Kathmandu-area children’s homes. RMF’s 2 nurses work to improve the overall health and wellbeing of the 172 children living in these homes.

  1. Assessing and recording children’s health conditions;
  2. Caring for sick children, who most often must be treated for:
  3. Diarrhea,
  4. Common cold viruses, and
  5. Skin infections;
  6. Teaching sanitation, proper use of bathroom facilities, waste management, and menstrual health;
  7. Providing fulltime care to special-needs children;
  8. Referring any complex children’s health cases to RMF for funding when NCO cannot afford treatment;
  9. Training house mothers on issues such as hygiene, sanitation, nutrition, and children’s health; and
  10. Looking for ways to provide continuous psychosocial support to the children.

Among the 172 children mentioned above, there are many with special needs, including: autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, tetraplegia, Down syndrome, and Global Developmental Delay (GDD). The presence of children with special needs makes the availability of our 2 resident nurses even more valuable, since it is imperative to have a health practitioner stay with the children at all times.

We received news from Nepal Children’s Organization (NCO) that Gambhir Balak, who we provided with an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scan as mentioned in the February 2016 report, has now been adopted.


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Results &

Accomplishments


  • Financial Support

    Providing Materials

    RMF supports NCO with USD 1,200 per month. These funds are used for medicines, medical supplies, and referrals (for the treatment of children at hospitals when required), and other needs.


  • Special Needs

    15 and younger

    The presence of children with special needs makes the availability of our 2 resident nurses even more valuable, since it is imperative to have a health practitioner stay with the children at all times.


  • Special Needs

    20 and older

    In addition to housing and helping at-risk children below the age of 15, Nepal Children’s Organization (NCO) is also housing other individuals above the age of 20 who need special care and treatment.


  • Update on Gambhir Balak

    Adoption

    We received news from Nepal Children’s Organization (NCO) that Gambhir Balak, who we provided with an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scan as mentioned in the February 2016 report, has now been adopted.


  • A Permanent Home

    Rebuilding the Orphanage

    RMF is planning to construct a spacious, earthquake-resistant permanent building for the children. A large piece of land next to the existing temporary structure has been allocated for the project. We hope to obtain approval for construction by November 2016.

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Background

& Objectives

Background

Established in 1964, Nepal Children’s Organization (NCO), also known as Balmandir (The Children’s Temple) is one of the oldest non-profit organizations in Nepal working for the protection and promotion of childrens’ rights and providing residential care to the children at risk. This includes orphans, differently-abled, abandoned and conflict affected children.

After the devastating earthquake on April 25th, followed by another strong earthquake on May 12th, an estimated 2,023 children have been confirmed dead. Likewise, the number of the injured children has been established at 876 and approximately, 200 children have lost their mothers and 112 have lost their fathers. Nearly 2 million children are said to have been affected by this mega quake and the powerful aftershocks thereafter. (Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare, June 2015)

Among those children who lost their parents, many have come under the tutelage of NCO, whose own shelter home was heavily destroyed by the disaster. Currently, through their 10 children’s homes within and outside Kathmandu valley, NCO has been caring for 280 children, including the earthquake-affected.

RMF will be supporting NCO in improving orphanage-based children’s health by providing better quality primary health care, including nutrition, sanitation and hygiene.


Objectives
  • Provide psychosocial counseling to deeply affected children
  • Construct a room for infants
  • Health and sanitation trainings for house mothers and children
  • Construct a room for differently-abled children
  • Provide better quality primary healthcare
  • Provide qualified staff nurses at NCO’s centers
  • Enhance knowledge and awareness of health and nutrition
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More

Photos

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Numbers

Served

February 1 – July 31, 2016

172 children receive care from 2 resident nurses

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Success

Stories

Ankit Balak

Ankit Balak, a 13-month-old boy, is suffering from multiple problems. He was found by the police on the streets of Kathmandu and was transferred to Nepal Children’s Organization (NCO). Ankit was diagnosed with mild hydrocephalus, cleft palate, cryptorchidism, relapsing fever, and malnutrition.

The doctor recommended cleft palate surgery after Ankit reached 10 kg. In our February 2016 report, we mentioned that we were waiting to have Ankit’s cleft palate surgery performed; his weight at that time was 4 kg. After proper care and diet, Ankit currently weighs 6 kg, which is a significant improvement considering his condition. The doctors are also planning for placement surgery to correct Ankit’s cryptorchidism. Our nurses have been regularly providing Ankit with BelVita and other nutritional supplements, and antibiotics when he has a recurring fever. Our nurses have been regularly following up his case with the doctors for physical examinations and providing timely diet and medication for Ankit.

Animai Shangbo

Animai Shangbo (or Ashika Balika), an 8-year-old girl, has been suffering from a mastoid infection since her admission to Nepal Children’s Organization (NCO). Animai was admitted to NCO after she lost her mother due to the earthquake. She is currently studying in first grade at Triveni Higher Secondary School.

On May 25, 2016, Animai Shangbo went through surgery on her ears to correct the mastoid infection, and regular ear cleaning is needed to remove the pus. Our nurses have been providing special care to Animai, giving her regular medication as prescribed by the doctors and timely dressing and cleansing of her ears to prevent pus from blocking her ears. She is also being provided with a protein diet to allow for faster healing from the surgery.

Ganga and Jamuna Pode

Ganga and Jamuna Pode, 2-and-a-half-month-old twin girls, were born prematurely in Paropakar Maternity and Women’s Hospital, Thapathali. The young twins were admitted to Nepal Children’s Organization (NCO) in the month of July 2016. Besides being born prematurely and being undernourished, the twins are also suffering from skin rashes due to dryness, and umbilical hernias.

Our nurses are regularly treating the twins’ rashes and umbilical hernias by providing calcium, multivitamins, and a daily skin massage with oil. The twins are slowly gaining weight due to proper care from the nurses and caretaker mothers.

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